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CategoriesBella-Dura In the News Indoor/Outdoor Fabric Performance Fabric

Erasing the line between indoor, outdoor fabrics

HIGH POINT — As the popularity of performance fabrics grows indoors, the differences and demands for outdoor vs. indoor features and looks continue to blur, too.

Culp observed the trend about two years ago when it undertook the soft launch of its own outdoor line, Livesmart Outdoor. The company had been seeing great success with its indoor performance fabric line, Livesmart, so it decided to move back to the performance fabric category’s outdoor roots.

“People loved Livesmart, so it was a natural next step for us to create Livesmart Outdoor both for our customers looking to make outdoor pieces and for the many folks who just prefer the extra protection provided by outdoor-safe fabrics,” said Tammy Buckner, senior vice president of design and marketing for Culp. “The lines are very similar, and our outdoor product is being used on indoor pieces quite often.”

But if the look and use of indoor and outdoor fabrics are shared, what even makes the difference between indoor and outdoor fabrics? Primarily, fabric sources say, it’s the fabrics’ definitions of performance.

“‘Performance’ is such a common word, and there is no official criteria you have to meet to call your fabric performance, so it can be a bit confusing,” explained Sarah Keelen, design director for outdoor and performance for Swavelle, parent company of performance fabric brand Bella-Dura. “But the one thing all performance fabrics tout is their easy cleanability. However, not all performance fabrics are appropriate for outdoor use.”

Stringent requirements

From the array of “performance” definitions, a handful of qualities almost always arise in some mixed form: durability, cleanability, water repellency and fade resistance.

For fabrics used outdoors, those qualities are more important, as performance features need to go well past just offering cleanability to perform. Outdoor environments require that performance fabrics offer significantly higher lightfastness and durability rates, and many put an emphasis on water resistance.

“Everyone knows a lot more happens outdoors, so to keep outdoor fabrics fresh, they have to be made for lots of sun, rain, snow and more,” said Christy Almond, vice president of product development and marketing for Valdese Weavers. “There are a lot of elements to contend with.”

But just because a piece of fabric may not face those exact conditions indoors does not mean those outdoor features go unused. Inside, water resistance translates into extra protection for spills, and durability and high fade resistance can add to the lifespan and overall quality of the fabric.

And fabric manufacturers such as Valdese Weavers, Sunbrella, Richloom Fabrics and Bella-Dura Home already cross-market performance fabric brands for indoor and outdoor use.

“Features that are usually associated with the outdoors, like fade resistance, are still beneficial,” said Almond. “If you have a sofa with an outdoor fabric on it, you can put it in a sunroom without worry or in front of a large window. And if the fabric is waterproof cleaning a spill inside or out is even simpler.”

Through the COVID-19 pandemic, outdoor cleanability has become even more important to Valedese Weavers’ Insideout brand, too. Culp and Bella-Dura Home have seen similar questions come from customers during the pandemic, both from consumers and retailers who have also begun more regularly cleaning furniture on their showrooms floors.

“We’ve had a lot of inquiries about bleach cleanability during the pandemic because people are being extra careful,” said Almond. “People wanted to be sure that regular cleanings with different chemicals wouldn’t compromise their fabrics’ colors or feel.”

To meet that information need, Valdese Weavers doubled down on testing its pieces’ cleanability in February, ultimately releasing updated information on the best ways to disinfect and clean its fabric pieces with cleaning products such as Lysol sprays and diluted bleach.

Outdoor design trends

Almond noted that, outside of performance features, the success of indoor/outdoor brands is in large part related to both technological advancements, making way for more advanced and textural outdoor-safe fabrics, and the outdoor room design trend, which has led many to invest in their outdoor spaces and furniture pieces.

“Now more than ever people are merging what outdoor and indoor spaces look like while trying to create some cohesiveness in their homes, especially with open concept living,” said Almond. “We are seeing a lot of the same trends indoors come outside, but we are still seeing some of the more playful patterns for outdoors, too.”

Specifically for Valdese Weavers, classic prints like gingham in trending colors have done well both indoors and out, calling back the look of a traditional picnic blanket and updating the motif with seasonal colors. Warm neutrals and more artisan textiles continue to trend for the company in both settings, along with blues and grays, which have been trending for several years.

Newer to the mix is bold combinations of black-and-white or neutral, and a full spectrum of green shades, from kelly to teal green, that pair up with a resurging interest in botanicals both in patterns and home decor in general.

At Culp, designs for Livesmart and Livesmart Outdoor are also very similar to each other, with the decision Buckner and her team to share looks and color palettes between the two lines having been informed by earlier trips to Salon del Mobile and Maison & Objet as well as the ongoing coronavirus.

“People are really looking for casual comfort during this time,” explained Buckner. “People are spending so much more time at home that they are looking to be comfortable, and they are looking for that inside their homes and outside now, too.”

While COVID-19 “pushed the trend to the next level,” Buckner said the outdoor room trend had been growing for a while before, with design shows like Maison & Objet dedicating trend displays to seamlessly blending indoor and outdoor pieces and materials.

Translating that blend into Livesmart Outdoor, Buckner said the company is approaching both brands with the same styles and themes, focusing on eclectic looks, boucles, chenilles and similar color palettes. Between the lines, Buckner said that, without a tag differentiating the two, people would not be able to tell the difference between them.

“We’re using a lot of light body plains all over on like sofas, in light or white, with black or dark java pillows. Really, block prints are just really huge right now. … Simple stripes mixed in with simple, small geometric have been important, too.”

Clean lines and, more specifically, a move away from the traditional florals and loud colors associated with outdoor looks have defined Livesmart Outdoor’s offerings.

Different spaces, different uses

Sunbrella approaches its fabrics with a little more emphasis on designing for both spaces separately, having divided its indoor- and outdoor-focused fabrics into divisions with separate marketing and design pushes, while still recognizing that both groups can go indoors or out.

“We design with aesthetics in mind, so when we approach an outdoor space its more about color and having more saturated, lively color,” said Sarah Dooley, marketing director for upholstery at Glen Raven. “That being said, we have seen trends over the past few years where you kind of have that sense that neutrals are moving outside as well as they are inside, and that’s reflected throughout. We really try to meet what the market wants.”

Dooley said that the design team at Sunbrella has had to adjust its thought process to help mimic indoor looks as they have seen people begin approaching outdoor design like they would the rest of their home. Neutrals have come into fashion in a big way outdoors, with pops of color and pattern being allocated to smaller pieces as accents, just as it has inside.

For texture, being sensitive to the different uses of fabrics indoors and out has been key, according to Dooley, as she noted that the sofa fabric you want to cuddle up with inside should feel different from the fabric on your outdoor lounger.

Keeping in mind the overall differences between indoor and outdoor design has been key to Bella-Dura Home’s approach, too.

“There is a real difference in the looks people buy for indoor verses outdoor use, which comes down to the environment the fabric will be used in,” said Keelen. “A typical outdoor space may be surrounded by trees, flowers, a pool, deck or patio — all of which provide a lot of texture. …  To balance all of this textural interest, fabrics are usually more paired down than indoor ones.”

Indoors, Keelen said fabrics have more wiggle room because texture is created by what is put in the room. Additionally, Keelen noted that outdoor fabrics often make use of more bright colors and contrasting patterns because of the natural light whereas indoors these colors can “overwhelm a space and people make much subtler choices.”

“I think the indoor outdoor lifestyle is something that will continue, even more so now given the current situation,” noted Dooley, adding, “We are all focusing on ways to stay on trend while also remaining timeless in both spaces.”

CategoriesIn the News

Design brands step up with coronavirus relief efforts

Though some states may be beginning to reopen, the fight against the coronavirus will continue for months to come. Last month, we began compiling a list of brands that are giving back—and since then, we’ve been heartened to watch the ranks swell considerably.

In a profound display of community, design industry businesses have been pitching in to support the medical sector’s COVID-19 relief efforts with sales and fundraisers, special events, and by manufacturing protective gear like masks, gowns and face shields. To tally every contribution is an impossible task, but through the dozens of initiatives included here, we’re thrilled to celebrate industry leaders doing their part to contribute during this crisis.

Editor’s note: The article has been continuously updated since it was originally published on April 6, 2020. The most recent additions to the list are denoted with an arrow (→).

SALES THAT GIVE BACKThese brands are donating a portion of their proceeds to organizations that are on the front lines of the coronavirus fight. Start shopping!

→ ABDB Cares
The award-winning furniture studio ABDB Designs has launched a new initiative, where 100 percent of sales from its exclusive ABDB Cares resin coaster set will be donated to Frontline Foods and Free Arts NYC.

Ann Gish & The Art of Home
Retailer Ann Gish is donating 30 percent of all online sales to The Red Cross and Doctors without Borders. The brand continues to sew face masks from its fabrics, donating them to the ICU team at NY Presbyterian Hospital.

Save the date! No matter what kind of client you’re pitching, many of the sales and customer service strategies you employed pre-COVID have no place in your toolkit now. In BOH’s next Community Discussion on Monday, May 11, we’ll be hosting a wide-ranging conversation with Crans BaldwinChuck Chewning and Marika Meyer about finding ways to add value for your clients and why relationships matter more than ever.

BOH editor in chief Kaitlin Petersen hosts a Q&A with industry experts every week on Zoom, exclusively for BOH Insiders. See the full schedule here. Not an Insider yet? Learn more here.

→ Bend Goods
The Los Angeles–based wire furniture company is offering 30 percent off its online sales, donating a portion of the proceeds to Project Angel Food, a nonprofit organization that is providing free, nutritious meals to the local community.

Everhem
The Los Angeles–based company that offers made-to-order window treatments is currently offering 30 percent off all orders, and will donate a portion of sales to the Los Angeles Regional Foodbank and the L.A. Emergency COVID-19 Crisis Fund. Everhem also plans to donate to the two COVID-19 relief funds set up by Gates Philanthropy Partners.

→ Faire
The wholesale marketplace Faire is selling all face masks at 0 percent commission until June 8 to ensure that retailers can get essential safety supplies to their communities. All masks are being featured in a special collection on the homepage of its website—as of May 8, over 200 makers are selling masks on the platform.

→ Flavor Paper
The wallcoverings brand Flavor Paper has launched “Positive Feedback,” a new fundraising initiative to support restaurants, health care workers and communities during the COVID-19 crisis. Now through May 31, Flavor Paper will donate 25 percent of website sales from its city-themed toiles category to East Bay FeedER and Frontline Foods.

Guy Regal
Five percent of any sale made on the fine art and furniture dealer’s website (or through its storefront on InCollect) will go to Citymeals on Wheels to serve at-risk community members.

→ Madame Malachite
The home decor and accessories brand Madame Malachite will donate 15 percent of all online sales to the World Health Organization’s COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund.

→ Minna
The ethically made home goods brand announces the launch of its sustainable masks in response to COVID-19. For every mask purchased, the brand will donate a mask to a New York shelter for women with mental health disorders experiencing homelessness.

→ Orior
The New York–based furniture company will relaunch its COVID-19 relief charity auction in partnership with the Mayor’s Fund To Advance New York City. The company will host the auction on Instagram starting on May 11 at 9 a.m. EST. All of the proceeds went directly to feed front-line staff in the New York health care system.

→ Ortho Mattress
From May 10 to 17, Ortho Mattress is holding a one-for-one sale: For every mattress purchased, the company will donate one to a COVID-19 frontline worker.

Design brands step up with coronavirus relief efforts

The Damask pillow in Blush from Pillow PopsCourtesy of Pillow Pops

Pillow Pops
For all of April and May, the cushions brand Pillow Pops is committing 10 percent of sales to No Kid Hungry to help provide meals to vulnerable children away from school.

Plover
The Seattle-based textile company Plover is making Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS)–certified organic cotton masks from its fabric scraps. The masks are being sold in packs of two online and via Instagram DM—for every unit sold, Plover will donate a two-pack to medical professionals in need.

→ Revival Rugs
In honor of National Nurses Week (May 6 to 12) and National EMS Week (May 17 to 23), Revival Rugs has announced a 20 percent discount to all health care workers through May 25 as a gesture of gratitude.

Serta Simmons Bedding
Serta Simmons Bedding, the parent company of Serta, Beautyrest and Tuft & Needle, committed to donating 10,000 mattresses to New York City hospitals and medical facilities that are facing shortages of hospital beds. They’​​ve also launched the ‘​​​​​​Stay Home, Send Beds’​​ initiative to facilitate bed donations for hospitals. Anyone who wishes can purchase a bed to be distributed in whichever U.S. city they choose. For every 25 beds that are donated, Serta will donate another on top of the 10,000 it has already committed.

→ Southern Guild The Southern Guild has launched “Closer, Still,” a group art exhibition to benefit those most vulnerable in South Africa during the COVID-19 crisis. Until May 9, 30 percent of sales from works sold will be donated to Afrika Tikkun, a nonprofit that has provided education, health and social services in South African townships for over 25 years.

→ Stark & The House of Scalamandré
For a limited time, Stark and The House of Scalamandré have brought their iconic prints to a collection of face masks. In addition to the medical mask donated for every purchase, the brands will match an additional 10 percent of all sales, donating the funds to the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club.

TAKING INITIATIVEIndustry names are doing what they can to fill community needs, locally, nationally and globally.

→ AATCC
For textile manufacturers making masks or gowns, the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists is now offering free tests to determine whether the fabrics being used are medical grade.

→ Benjamin Moore
In collaboration with the Painting Contractors Association, Benjamin Moore has pledged to underwrite participation costs for the PCA’s Operation COVID-19 Response, an eight-week online conference aiming to provide strategies and resources to painting contractors. With the help of Benjamin Moore, both PCA members and non-members will be able to take advantage of this virtual training.

With the majority of employees based in The Garden State, the company has also donated $100,000 to the Community FoodBank of New Jersey and Frontline Foods, providing nearly 230,000 meals to residents and health care workers throughout the state. In its Newark facility, Benjamin Moore has leveraged its production resources to manufacture hand sanitizer for donation. These bottles were delivered to the New Jersey State Police for distribution among the essential medical professionals in hospitals and health care facilities across the state.

→ The Company Store
The bedding and bath material supply company has donated over 10,000 units (worth $1.2 million) of its bedding product to be made into over 500,000 masks for health care workers.

→ East Fork
After the ceramics company concluded its “Gift a Mug” campaign, it went on to launch a series of weekly raffles with the goal of raising $100,000 for social justice-focused organizations. Their current raffle is supporting the Asheville City Schools Foundation, and their final raffle will launch this Thursday.

→ Fermob
The Fermob dealer network in the U.S. has been quietly supporting its local community through charity efforts and donated time. While some are giving directly through grassroots initiatives, others have developed their own fundraising efforts to help those most vulnerable during this time.

→ Fireclay Tile
The San Francisco–based tile company has created a child care fund program as part of the “Give, You Get” initiative to help workers subsidize child care costs.

Formica
The Formica Corporation has pledged to donate up to 500,000 meals to Feeding America food banks nationwide through its Lunch & Learn program. Now, for every video view through April 30, the company will donate 10 meals to Feeding America food banks.

→ GoodWeave
GoodWeave, the leading nonprofit working to end forced, bonded and child labor in global supply chains, has launched the COVID-19 Child and Worker Protection Fund to deliver humanitarian aid and services to vulnerable populations in India, Nepal and Afghanistan. The fund is focusing its reach to aid marginalized workers and children in producer communities.

→ Hinkley
Lighting and ceiling fan company Hinkley has donated 500 ceiling fan units to first responders and volunteers in the fight against COVID-19.

→ Your Home Collaboration’
In an effort to support front-line medical professionals, Anna Maria Mannarino, former president of ASID’s New Jersey Chapter, has launched “Your Home Collaboration.” The initiative urges interior designers to provide free design consultations to the COVID-19 workforce, either virutally or in person at a later date. Those interested in donating their services, or those wishing to nominate a medical professional for the program, can do so here.

VIRTUAL CAMPAIGNSCompanies are finding innovative ways to stay connected online—and make a difference in the process.

#DesignStandsTogether
The design and architecture PR firm Novità launched the campaigns #DesignStandsTogether and #OneWithItaly on March 12 as a way of uniting the industry through bright news amidst the COVID-19 headlines.

#DoingWellByDoingRight
The nonprofit organization Be Original Americas is launching its #DoingWellByDoingRight campaign on Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook to advocate for design authenticity, spotlighting members that are making an impact with design.

Forty One Madison’s #TableTogether
From Forty One Madison comes #TableTogether, a social initiative launched as a response to New York’s canceled Tabletop Market. For every photo posted on Instagram with the tag, Forty One Madison will purchase a gift card to a restaurant in Flatiron district. Each person who posts, registers and attends the next New York Tabletop Market will be able to claim a gift card.

→ Garnet Hill
The retail brand has not only donated 50 sets of organic cotton sheets for face mask production, but it has also promised to match up to $1 million in customer and team member donations to Meals on Wheels and No Kid Hungry.

→ Ratana
In addition to sewing masks for senior homes across the Pacific Northwest, the brand launched its #BetterDaysWithRatana campaign to share its clients’ favorite projects that speak to happier times in the industry.

Southern Studio Simplified
The Cary, North Carolina–based firm has launched a new design program called Southern Studio Simplified. This exclusive opportunity will help clients tackle smaller projects through virtual consultations—each week, the design team will focus on a different topic, ranging from gallery walls and home offices to color choices and kids’ rooms. For every consultation scheduled during the course of the coronavirus pandemic, the Southern Studio team pledges one hour of volunteer service to the local Cary community.

Stitchroom
The Brooklyn-based custom upholstery platform is not only making masks, but has also launched a site that connects able sewers with hospitals in need, as well as an accompanying Facebook page to field questions and foster community.

Westchester Mask Making Campaign
In collaboration with Plaza Park Interiors in Mamaroneck and Amy Interiors in Eastchester, Patricia O’Shaughnessy Design in Bronxville is coordinating a grassroots effort to facilitate the sewing, making and distribution of masks and personal protective equipment for New York hospitals and health care facilities. In addition to calling for cotton fabric donations and volunteer services, the campaign has started a GoFundMe page where monetary donations can be made to support sewers in the workrooms.

THE INDUSTRY MASK-FORCEIndustry manufacturers are pivoting their production facilities to make medical supplies. They deserve a standing ovation—not only for their donations, but also for the employees who have committed to helping their communities.

American Leather
In the words of the Dallas-based manufacturer, “We may not be making furniture at the moment due to the COVID-19 crisis; however, we’re busy making masks and gowns each week for people on the front lines.” In addition to donating face masks to health care workers, American Leather launched a new website for consumers to buy masks.

Appleton Partners LLP
The Santa Monica, California–based architecture firm has risen to the occasion and begun 3-D printing reusable plastic face masks for local hospitals and medical facilities.

→ Arhaus
The family-owned home furnishings retailer is utilizing its resources to make masks for medical groups, first responders, health care providers and other community members.

Aria Designs
The North Carolina–based upholstery and leather company Aria Designs has secured funding from CIT Group to tap into its global supply chain and manufacturers to bring N95 surgical masks to health care facilities across the state.

Austin’s Couch Potatoes
On March 20, the Texas-based furniture store and manufacturer began sewing face masks and hospital gowns to help fill the shortages presented by the spread of COVID-19. The company is partnering with Austin Disaster Relief Network to get the supplies to those local facilities, and aims to make 3,500 (free) masks a day, adding hospital gowns to their production list.

Avery Boardman
Custom upholstery brand Avery Boardman has been gathering materials and reaching out to manufacturers to donate supplies to mask and medical equipment to hospitals.

Baker
The contemporary furniture brand Baker has dedicated its U.S. manufacturing facilities, design resources and high-quality fabrics to the production of masks and gowns, all of which will be donated to local hospitals in North Carolina.

→ Carvart
The architectural glass and hardware company Carvart has been manufacturing tempered glass protective screens to be used as a hygienic barrier by workers in essential businesses like pharmacies, grocery stores and banks.

Century Furniture
Working with companies like Sherrill Furniture Brands, Century Furniture is donating materials to the Owosso, Michigan–based furniture company Woodard to assist in the production of masks.

→ Cerno The Laguna Beach, California–based lighting company has set out to manufacture approximately 10,000 face shields to donate to local hospitals. In the words of Cerno co-founder Daniel Wacholder: “Everyone has something they can contribute to this fight. We saw a need to make something, and that is what we do.”

→ Chilewich
Chilewich’s factory in Chatsworth, Georgia, is now producing not only table mats, floor mats, wall textiles, and upholstery, but also personal protective gowns—as many as 25,000 per week.

→ Classy Art
For a limited time, while supplies last, the Houston, Texas–based wall decor company is giving free disposable masks to retailers, accepting requests via email.

The Company Store
The Company Store has donated 600 units of cotton sheet to TX N95Quilting for a CauseSewing Masks for Atlanta Hospitals, and Project Runway alumna Amanda Perna, all of whom are using the fabric to sew face masks.

Design brands step up with coronavirus relief efforts

An employee sewing a mask out of CW Stockwell’s Martinique fabric in OliveCourtesy of CW Stockwell

CW Stockwell x Caitlin Wilson Design x Delgado NYC
Together, CW Stockwell, Caitlin Wilson’s eponymous Dallas firm, and handbag designer Delgado NYC have teamed up to produce over 1,000 nonmedical masks to donate to health care workers nationwide. The trio started a GoFundMe page to help compensate the men and women who are sewing the masks.

 Designtex x West Elm
Together, West Elm and Designtex have joined forces to design, manufacture and produce 13,000 cotton face masks to support COVID-19 efforts. The masks are produced in Designtex’s facility in Portland, Maine.

Design brands step up with coronavirus relief efforts

A Designtex sewer at work in its Portland, Maine facilityCourtesy of Designtex

Eastern Accents
The luxury bedding and linens brand Eastern Accents has shifted operations, devoting its resources to producing up to 1,000 face masks each day, to be donated to hospitals and other facilities in the Chicago area. The company has also made the masks available for purchase online, with all proceeds going to the donation drive.

EJ Victor
In recent weeks, the High Point, North Carolina–based furniture manufacturer has taken a serious look at its supply chain, strategizing ways that the company can give back to local health care facilities. Already underway is mask production, with medical-grade surgical gowns and reclining hospital beds in the works, CFO David Bennett tells Business of Home.

Eskayel
As states begin to encourage citizens to wear masks in public, the textile company Eskayel is now selling them to consumers in sets of five, pledging all sales to COVID-19 relief.

→ Essence of Harris
The Scotland–based family business made a name for itself crafting scented candles—and now it has shifted operations to produce hand sanitizer, which it is giving to its local community free of charge.

Fabricut
The Tulsa, Oklahoma–based fabric company has converted its sample room to mask making, donating Fabricut masks to local health care workers at three major hospital systems.

Food52 x Steele Canvas
While Amanda Hesser has been keeping our kitchens busy through Instagram Live cooking demonstrations, another part of the Food52 team has partnered with one of their makers, Steele Canvas, to create denim and flannel masks. The home goods company is selling them online in a buy-one-give-one model for medical facilities around the U.S. In the first 36 hours of the preorder, the brand was able to donate 10,000 masks—and a second preorder is already underway.

→ Gloster
The premium outdoor furniture brand Gloster is providing PPE for essential workers, with upholstery specialists observing social distancing rules as they sew various protective equiptment.

Goddard Design Group
Goddard Design Group noticed early on that the memo samples in its library were the perfect size to make washable mask covers. Calling on the help of local seamstresses and workrooms, the firm has teamed up with the Arkansas Arts & Fashion Forum to donate home-sewn masks to local medical facilities, as well as accept donations of usable cotton fabric.

→ Harvard GSD
The Harvard Graduate School of Design has begun the production of PPE using its over 100 3-D printers. The school has produced nearly 1,000 face shields and 750 visors, all of which are being donated to Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

→ HBF Textiles
The Hickory, North Carolina–based HBF Textiles is now producing and donating washable masks, N-95 respirator covers and protective gowns.

Holly Hunt
Holly Hunt is partnering with a local Chicago drapery workroom to convert Great Plains textiles into nonsurgical mask covers, all of which will be donated to local hospitals.

Jiun Ho at Dennis Miller Associates
Using textiles from its own inventory, Jiun Ho is working to produce medical masks for health care workers.

Kravet Inc.
Out of its South Carolina warehouse, Kravet is not only producing face masks, but has donated over 1,000 yards of fabric to Woodard to help sew masks in bulk. “From the moment in mid-March when we heard about the dire need for masks in the health systems of North America, we immediately converted our sample department in South Carolina into mask making,” Cary Kravet tells BOH. To date, the company has proudly donated over 10,000 masks to those on the front lines, as well as 1,000 to employees and their families. Kravet Inc. has also donated 2,000 yards of fabric to those around the country who desire to make their own masks. “It is our hope that we have done a small but significant part in the global effort to keep people safe at this time,” says Kravet.

→ Laura Park Designs
The home and textiles brand Laura Park Designs is currently making face masks out of its vibrant patterns—all of the proceeds from online mask sales will be donated to Feeding America.

→ Lauren HB Studio
The Ohio-based studio specializes in functional and sculptural ceramics, but has recently set out to create fabric masks for front-line workers, offering sales to the public as demand has increased.

Design brands step up with coronavirus relief efforts

A model of the hospital bed design by Loll DesignsCourtesy of Loll Designs

Loll Designs
Usually, this Minnesota-based company manufactures outdoor furnishings from recycled plastic materials. Since the pandemic, however, Loll Designs has shifted operations, and is now making ready-to-build hospital field beds with reclining backs and adjustable headrests. Fashioned from durable and sanitary HDPE (high-density polyethylene), these beds are recyclable and available for worldwide shipping.

→ Louis Poulsen
The Danish lighting brand is donating 10,000 N95 masks to the Cleveland Clinic in Weston, Florida, where its U.S. offices are located. In addition to health care workers, Louis Poulsen will donate masks to other first responders, including police officers and the fire department.

Matouk
Currently Matouk is able to produce over 3,000 fabric masks per day, and will continue to do so long as the health care industry needs. The company is also producing an additional 25,000 masks per week with its partners in the Philippines.

→ Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams
From Taylorsville, North Carolina, Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams has been hard at work supporting medical personnel and first responders—the company has shifted operations, now producing nonsurgical masks and gowns.

Mohawk Industries
Flooring manufacturing company Mohawk Industries has teamed up with Fabric Sources International to begin producing medical isolation gowns and protective face shields in Atlanta and around Dalton, Georgia. Mohawk has shifted the focus of its engineering and sewing teams to design, test and create medical gowns, averaging 1,200 per day (and growing). While initial donations are going to local medical centers, the companies hope to expand their reach to other Georgia hospitals.

The New Traditionalists and Ducduc
Custom furniture designer The New Traditionalists has come together with sister brand Ducduc Kids, transitioning the company’s production facility to make essential health care furniture like beds, carts, partitions, dividers and day care furniture in addition to face masks and gowns.

Design brands step up with coronavirus relief efforts

Norwalk Furniture employee modeling a gownCourtesy of Norwalk Furniture

Norwalk Furniture
The Ohio furniture company has been approved by Huron County to run as an essential business to redirect production to make hospital gowns and masks.

→ O. Henry House
American upholstery brand O. Henry House has been producing masks in partnership with the Carolina Textile District.

Ortho Mattress
Ortho Mattress has reconfigured operations in its Phoenix factory and is now producing 1,000 nonmedical face masks each day to donate to essential workers, asking only for the cost of shipping to be covered.

Peacock Alley
Based in Dallas, the luxury bed and bath linens company Peacock Alley has been producing masks made by its skeleton crew of on-site seamstresses, with others working from home. Currently, the masks are going to hospitals and other front-line workers.

Pindler
Fabric design and developer Pindler invites designers to join it in sewing for the #MillionMaskChallenge, a Twitter-born tag to rally both industry sewers and DIY-ers to sew masks to meet the critical needs of health care workers, and now, civilians.

→ PPEople Brigade
Started by Paige Cox, a Greensboro, North Carolina–based textile artist and the co-founder of Reconsidered Goods, a nonprofit for repurposing creative materials, the PPEople Brigade is a grassroots network working to make and donate face masks and sheilds. Over 1,000 have been donated to local North Carolina hospitals, and several have been shipped to Michigan and New York as well.

Ralph Lauren Corporation
The fashion and lifestyle brand has pledged $10 million to COVID-19 relief, which will provide financial grants through the Emergency Assistance Foundation; contribute to the World Health Organization COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund; support the Pink Pony Fund for vulnerable cancer patients; and give an inaugural gift to the Council of Fashion Designers of America/Vogue Fashion Fund for COVID-19 relief. What’s more, the company is producing 250,000 masks and 25,000 isolation gowns for donation with its U.S. manufacturing partners.

RCH Studios
The design collective RCH Studios has been 3-D printing face shields for hospital workers—to date, its team has produced over 1,800 PPEs.

→ Rich Brilliant Willing
The Brooklyn–based lighting company is using its manufacturing capabilities to make PPE for health care workers in the New York area. Working in conjunction with iMakr, Rich Brilliant Willing has been supplying materials to digital fabricators to assemble approximately 10,000 face shields. Concurrently, the brand has redesigned its face shield, and pending approval by the National Institutes of Health, 3-D printing of the new design will make the process even more efficient.

Roger and Chris
The North Carolina–based custom furniture company has dedicated a portion of its team to sew face masks to donate to those on the front lines of COVID-19 relief.

Design brands step up with coronavirus relief efforts

Precedent Furniture, which manufactures many of Room & Board’s accent chairs, beds and sofas, has been producing protective masks (pictured above).Courtesy of Room & Board

→ Room & Board
Modern funiture company Room & Board is known for partnering with companies whose values align with sustainability efforts and helping local communities—during the COVID-19 crisis, many of the company’s U.S. manufacturing partners have been producing PPE for donation.

Rosemary Hallgarten
The Fairfield, Connecticut–based rug and fabric brand has donated its Linen Emil fabric to an unnamed designer in Chicago who is making masks for emergency workers. The company has also tasked its own workroom with making masks for local Connecticut hospitals.

Salone del Mobile.Milano
The fair was postponed, but the organizers of Salone del Mobile didn’t let that stop them from supporting their community. With thanks expressed to the Chinese design sector, VNU Exhibitions Asia, FederlegnoArredo and Salone del Mobile.Milano, 545,000 medical masks have been donated to the Italian Red Cross.

Sandra Jordan Prima Alpaca
The Healdsburg, California–based company is partnering with its artisan network to “lend a helping hoof” by donating archived fabric to its partners to sew hundreds of nonsurgical masks for local health care workers in Sonoma County.

Schumacher
Not only has Schumacher donated hundreds of yards of fabric to the efforts organized by Woodard and other smaller mask-making initiatives, but the luxury fabric brand is currently producing about 500 masks per day at its facility in South Carolina. Masks are being donated to the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, in addition to local South Carolina health care workers.

Sherrill Furniture Brands
The North Carolina–based furniture company has been working with Woodard, donating materials to help produce masks for hospitals and emergency workers.

Silk Road Rug Inc.
The Los Angeles–based rug distributor and workroom is seeking donations of unused fabric rolls and sample remnants from the interior design and textile industries in L.A. County to go towards handmade face masks to be donated to local hospitals and doctor offices. Silk Road Rug Inc. has converted three-quarters of its workroom to make protective gear for health care workers.

Stylex
The New Jersey–based office seating brand is producing washable, protective masks for health care workers. Stylex invites those in the tri-state area to connect with its team should they want to join the initiative, or if they know of facilities in need of supplies.

Sutherland Furniture
Sutherland Furniture and Perennials Fabrics have pivoted operations and dedicated their warehouses to the production of health masks to be donated to health care workers and others fighting on the COVID-19 front lines, using the hashtag #TheHeartOfDesign on Instagram as part of its initiative. The solution-dyed acrylic fabric masks are bleach-washable and will extend the life of regulation N95 face masks and can withstand repeated cleaning.

Swavelle
Wearbest Weavers, a subsidiary of Swavelle, has successfully pivoted to creating PPE textiles that comply with national standards to meet Barrier I, II and III qualifications. The goods are qualified to be sewn into medical, hospital and isolation gowns, as well as other protective clothing.

Design brands step up with coronavirus relief efforts

A woman sewing a mask in the Thibaut workroomCourtesy of Thibaut

Thibaut
The Newark, New Jersey–based sewing department at fine fabrics and wallcoverings company Thibaut has been busy making fabric face masks to aid health care and essential workers extend the life of their equipment. Thibaut not only has donated over 600 masks, but it has also donated fabric to sewers and workrooms nationwide.

The Urban Electric Co.
When construction and engineering company the Bourne Group asked if Urban Electric would be willing to help produce face shields, the custom lighting company answered with gusto. Using its water jet capabilities, donated equipment and its craftsman crew, Urban Electric is working to make thousands of these face shields to donate to the Medical University of South Carolina and the staff at Ropers St. Francis Healthcare.

→ Wearbest Weavers
Wearbest Weavers has pivoted its production efforts from performance textiles to weaving PPE fabric, now supplying fully tailored medical gowns. The gowns are meet the standards of Barrier Levels I, II and III, in accordance with CDC guidelines.

Woodard Furniture
For over 150 years, Woodard Furniture has crafted high-end outdoor furniture pieces—but at present, the company has a skeleton crew working to sew as many as 1,000 non-N95 masks per day to donate to medical facilities in need, working with the donated textiles from many powerhouse industry brands that have sent fabric donations.

PAST INITIATIVES

These industry players helped lead the charge, and while their initiatives may have expired, BOH would like their efforts to be remembered here.

Aerin
Last month, luxury lifestyle brand Aerin donated 20 percent of sales from its home decor and tabletop and bar categories to God’s Love We Deliver—a nonprofit organization that prepares and delivers meals to people unable to provide or prepare food for themselves.

→ Arteriors
Arteriors launched a social campaign in support of artists and makers during this time. United by the hashtag #MeansForMakers, the company seeks to raise COVID-19 relief donations for CERF+, a nonprofit organization that focuses on safeguarding artists’ livelihoods. Until May 7, Arteriors donated $5 for every Instagram post tagged with @arteriorshome and #MeansForMakers.

Artsy
For the month of April, the online art platform donated 10 percent of sales from its “Give Back” collections to the COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund for the World Health Organization. The other proceeds went to the represented galleries and their artists. This came as part of its #ArtKeepsGoing campaign, created to unite the art world and art industry at large. “This moment in time is unprecedented for the world and our respective communities,” said Marina Cashdan, vice president of editorial, brand and creative at Artsy. “With the physical art world indefinitely closed, we wanted to demonstrate how art keeps going during times of crisis and uncertainty.”

East Fork’s Gift a Mug
The Asheville, North Carolina–based ceramics company East Fork launched an initiative called Gift a Mug to support Vecinos, a free clinic that serves uninsured and underinsured patients working on farms. For every mug purchased, $25 went directly to Vecinos, and the mug was gifted to a health care worker at Mission Hospital. East Fork raised over $15,000 for Vecinos.

General Assembly
In April, Brooklyn–based interior architecture studio General Assembly hosted “At Home,” an online auction “from home and for the home.” Proceeds supported Direct Relief’s COVID-19 fund. Participating brands included Apparatus, Calico Wallpaper, Egg Collective and Roll & Hill.

The Invisible Collection
The Invisible Collection hosted a charity auction with 25 bespoke pieces that ended May 4. All proceeds supported emergency services globally, including a portion of funds that went to Feeding America in the United States.

Homepage image: Shutterstock

 

This press release is submitted and shown here in its original form, unedited by Business of Home.

CategoriesIn the News

Wearbest Weavers Now Supplying Hospital Gowns

GARFIELD, N.J. – Wearbest Weavers, LLC has been committed to mobilizing their technology to support and serve medical personnel since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. In a matter of weeks, Wearbest pivoted their production from performance textiles to weaving PPE fabric, and is now supplying fully tailored medical gowns.

The medical gowns are made with fabrics that are tested for ANSI/AAMI PB 70 standards for Barrier Levels I, II and III. These fabrics are constructed with durable, washable materials. The fabrics were retested after 50 commercial laundering settings in high temperatures as recommended by the CDC with consistent results.

“The healthcare industry primarily uses disposable gowns, for us to be competitive and environmentally conscious we took the extra diligence and effort to develop a washable gown that can be reused”, said Salman Chaudhry, director of Operations.

The entire supply chain of these gowns is Berry Compliant. From raw materials to the finished product, everything is domestically sourced and Made in the USA. Production will not be impacted by any restrictions or disruptions on or by foreign imports.

Greg Thomases, vice president of Wearbest parent company Swavelle adds, “The most efficient way to help during this crisis is to offer a fully finished product. Our fabric is woven in NJ, finished in NC, and the gowns are fabricated in NY.  We are very proud to offer a Made in the USA product.”

www.swavelle.com

 

This press release is submitted and shown here in its original form, unedited by Patio & Hearth.

CategoriesIn the News

U.S. Textile Mill Wearbest Weavers Develops PPE Textiles

 

This press release is submitted and shown here in its original form, unedited by Furniture Today.

Garfield NJ – Wearbest Weavers, LLC has been a longstanding supplier of technical performance fabrics to the healthcare industry providing micro and bacterial resistant upholstery product. These durable textiles are bleach cleanable and have been used in hospitals, medical clinics, nursing homes, and assisted living facilities.

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the shortage of necessary medical supplies, the mill has been successful in creating and pivoting their production to PPE textiles. The protective fabrics Wearbest has tirelessly developed, comply with national standards to meet Barrier Levels I, II and III. The goods are qualified to be fabricated into medical gowns, hospital gowns, isolation gowns and other protective clothing. The Barrier Level 1 fabric offers protection from pathogens and can be washed to commercial standards.

Greg Thomases, Vice President of Wearbest parent company Swavelle added, “I am very proud of our team effort to turn around our production so quickly. We are fortunate to have a US mill that provides us the capability to produce PPE product. We’ve accomplished a lot in just a few weeks and plan to continue innovating through this unprecedented time. Our hope is to help meet the needs of thousands of frontline healthcare workers.”

CategoriesIn the News

NCTO: Textile Industry Unites To Play Critical Role For The Nation’s Production Of PPE Products

WASHINGTON — April 9, 2020 — The National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO), representing the full spectrum of U.S. textiles from fiber through finished products, issued a statement today from textile executives leading the nation’s unified effort to produce critical personal protective equipment (PPE) to help hospitals and healthcare workers fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.

In factories across the country, textile companies are retooling production virtually overnight to produce PPE products ranging from hospital gowns, face masks and shoe covers to scrubs. The industry is playing a critical role in the nation’s manufacturing strategy and solution to help contribute to the high demand for these products.

“Coordinating with local hospitals, healthcare organizations, the entire U.S. production chain and federal agencies, the textile industry has been at the forefront of the incredible manufacturing effort, contributing to the country’s rapid response to the rising needs of frontline workers,” said NCTO President and CEO Kim Glas.

“This industry has taken the lead in this effort, utilizing American manufacturing facilities and workers, despite facing many challenges in this environment. Our industry will continue to do all they can to serve the American people, frontline hospital workers and patients at this time.”

U.S. apparel and textile executives, representing the entire supply chain, from fiber to finished apparel, share their involvement in the monumental task of providing PPE products during challenging times.

The quotes from textile and apparel executives below offer a snapshot of efforts throughout the entire supply chain to provide PPE products for our nation.

As a demonstration of this effort, NCTO shares a few of the many stories emerging from our NCTO members at this time:

Beverly Knits Inc.

“Our team has stepped up to the challenge of fighting Covid-19 and flattening the curve,” said Ron Sytz, CEO of Beverly Knits. “We have organized a team of 25+ companies with over 4,000 American textile and apparel workers, to manufacture personal protective mask for HHS.  Through NCTO and SEAMS [The Association & Voice of the U.S. Sewn Products Industry] we continue to engage with additional companies to help fight this pandemic and flatten the curve.”

Burlington Industries LLC

“Burlington is proud to be a part of an industry with such compassion and call to action as we have seen over the last couple of weeks in the fight against COVID-19,” said Allen Smith, president Burlington, Safety Components & A&E – Americas. “With 40 years of experience in medical fabrics, Burlington is glad to offer its reusable woven products and technical expertise to those within and outside our industry who are stepping up to help produce lifesaving PPE.  Our employees are committed to the cause and working tirelessly in North Carolina to increase production, reallocate resources and support the evolving needs as much as possible.  Reusable fabrics are critical in reducing the scarcity of PPE and increasing availability on the front lines, offering responsible solutions with advanced protection, comfort and durability where it counts the most. Throughout our Elevate portfolio of brands we are also offering support through the use of A&E technical threads and utilizing our network of contacts and expertise across Cone Denim and Safety Components to make connections, offer guidance and facilitate meaningful conversations to support our communities and healthcare heroes.”

Cotswold Industries Inc.

“Cotswold and Central Textiles have pivoted to making PPE substrates for single use non-woven fabrics for and also for reusable PPE,” said James McKinnon CEO of Cotswold. “We have ramped our reusable fabric production and hope to produce 100-150K/week very shortly.”

Gildan Activewear Inc.

“We are pleased to join forces with various business partners in the U.S. to reopen some of Gildan’s global manufacturing facilities under a strict biosecurity protocol to produce face masks and isolation gowns in support of the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Chuck Ward, president of Gildan Yarns. “We are also proud to have donated a number of N95 protective face masks to local hospitals or health and human services organizations in the U.S. to support front line healthcare providers who continue to deliver exceptional care to patients and their families during this crisis,” he added.

Glen Raven Inc.

“The U.S. textile industry has emerged as a critical part of the solution in protecting our frontline workers from COVID-19,” said Leib Oehmig, Glen Raven CEO and NCTO chairman. “Through our collaborative efforts across the industry and with our employees, customers, suppliers and the medical community, the industry has retooled many operations and is supplying important PPE like masks, face shields, swabs, wipes, gowns and many other products. Glen Raven, through our business units, is actively working with our partners across many industries and have aligned our resources to focus on PPE inputs where we are in the best position to offer solutions. These include inputs for gowns, face shields, mask covers, and temporary structures. As part of our response, Glen Raven has organized a fabrication group with several of our customers who are producing face shields and gowns. This group is collaborating with hospital systems across the country to design and scale production of these important products.”

Greenwood Mills

“Venturing into a completely new territory in less than a week’s time was certainly a calculated risk, but one that we feel will pay off in the long run not just for our company, but for our larger community,” said Jay Self, president and chief operating officer of Greenwood Mills. “We have made the switch from denim production to masks and gowns. The first full week of production will result in about 30,000 masks. At full capacity, the company will produce 500,000 masks and 300,000 gowns per week, with flexibility depending on the demand of the products. It’s a testament to our workforce and ingenuity that we were able to make this transition happen so quickly.”

Hamrick Mills

“We at Hamrick Mills have dedicated a significant portion of our manufacturing capacity to the production of scrubs, gowns, masks, and related PPE,” said Jim Hopkins, director of sales at Hamrick. “We are considered and designated as an essential business concern and are intent on doing our share to assist those in need­ patients, front line first responders, and the general public, during this national crisis.”

Hanesbrands Inc.

“We are proud to be working with the apparel consortium and the National Council of Textile Organizations to rapidly mobilize to meet such an important and critical national need for face masks during this pandemic,” said Michael E. Faircloth, Hanesbrands group president, global operations, American casualwear and e-commerce. “Our employees and those of our consortium partners have been working around the clock to transition production from basic apparel to face mask production. This has required amazing cooperation and close coordination among the government, raw material suppliers, logistics providers and our supply chain employees. Together we are achieving a monumental task, which has resulted in the manufacture and delivery of millions of masks already with hundreds of millions more to come soon. Apparel industry leaders, particularly the consortium members, have successfully turned on a dime to meet the greater good of society.”

Lenzing Fibers Inc.

“Like many companies, Lenzing was working to understand exactly what was needed during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic and we already had fibers in a variety of PPE applications,” said David Adkins, Lenzing commercial manager-Americas Textiles. “Thanks to the information provided by NCTO and several other industry organizations we were able to better clarify market needs and determine and provide appropriate products to fit the markets requirement.”

Milliken & Company

“Many of Milliken’s U.S. customers in the flame resistant, workwear, and industrial space have pivoted their operations to manufacture PPE,” shared Chad McAllister, president of the Milliken Textile Division and EVP of Milliken & Company. “When we saw a need to shift to medical grade textiles, our team quickly stepped up. As of today, we have scaled production of these new products so that together with our customers we can help protect medical workers.”

MMI Textiles Inc.

“For our part, MMI has been focusing on raw materials for all 4 gown levels, both immediate inventory and future production orders, N95 and personal protection masks, face shields and any other PPE raw material,” said Amy Bircher, president and founder of MMI.  “We successfully helped secure immediate raw material for Crye Precision, and they gave a shout out to us on a press conference with the Mayor of NYC. We have secured finished masks to donate to local hospitals that we imported from overseas, and also bought face shields locally to donate. MMI is stocking a variety of widths of elastic for use in a variety of PPE applications — our plan is to create a robust stock option so that customers can ultimately pull product for immediate delivery.”

Parkdale Inc.

“Parkdale has been an American company since 1916 and as such we feel a sense of duty and an obligation to answer our nation’s call for personal protective equipment,” said Anderson Warlick, chairman and CEO of Parkdale. “We are proud to work with our industry colleagues as we work together to retool, re-equip and redirect our plants and supply chains so that every citizen in the United States gets a personal protection mask.”

Picanol of America

“The nature of Picanol of America,Inc., business is to support the U.S. textile industry, especially our weaving customers,” said Cyril Guérin, president of Picanol. “Spare parts, electronic repair and technical services are what we offer day in and day out. Throughout this ordeal, we have not skipped a beat, though the environment is clearly challenging. Our customers produce critical fabrics to be transformed in health care personnel uniform, mattress casing and sheets for the patients, and probably many other PPE. As long as our weaving customers will produce, we will stand by them. This has created a tremendous amount of stress on our associates but their ‘forward looking’ attitude has been an inspiration. It is all about surviving this together.”

Schneider Mills

“Schneider Mills has been very active in the past few weeks in responding to many customer needs for fabric during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. We have responded to hurried orders of fabric for the outdoor shelters you see outside medical facilities across America,” said Curt Parker, vice president of operations at Schneider Mills. “Demand in lightweight rip-stop fabrics being used for medical gowns and light weight tents has increased as well. We are continuing to supply to the medical tape industry for 3M. We are responding to a new customer for barrier fabrics in the medical end uses. We are pleased to be doing all we can to support our country in this war with COVID-19. Our employees are putting forth great efforts in these changes as they occur rapidly.”

Shuford Yarns LLC

“Shuford makes yarn for several medical applications such as diabetic socks, gloves, cuffs for surgical gowns, towels going to the military through the Federal Prison industry. Shuford has been given a number of opportunities to participate in making yarns for PPE, surgical gowns etc.,” said Marvin Smith, president and CEO of Shuford. “We are working with a car manufacture who is making PPE for several hospitals in their local area. We also internally are using some of our people who are taking fabric from a few of customers and making PPE to give to people in our community.  With all the negatives in our country, our people have found ways to have a positive in our community.”

Standard Textile

“Our healthcare customers are on the front line of treating patients and saving lives, and we’re relentlessly working to ensure our customers and our communities have continuous access to essential supplies needed to safeguard the health of clinicians, patients, and their families,” said Gary Heiman, president and CEO of Standard Textile. Heiman is fiercely committed to manufacturing as much reusable PPE and other healthcare products as possible — as quickly as possible — to alleviate the stress placed upon the healthcare industry and support the fight against COVID-19. “My concern is we are missing urgent collaboration opportunities with federal or state governments to allow us to serve healthcare workers who are at the frontline of this crisis,” said Heiman.

The Brickle Group

“The Brickle group will be starting production on a general everyday mask produced utilizing our filtration felt from our nonwoven division Bouckaert Industrial Textiles,” said Max Brickle, president of Brickle. “We have developed a supply chain of New England textile manufacturers to be able to produce these masks. The masks we are producing domestically are machine washable meant for everyday public use, not medical use. We are also involved in importing hospital grade PPE for the New England region.”

The LYCRA Company

“The LYCRA Company, the only spandex producer in the U.S., is proud to produce and supply LYCRA® fiber, nylon, and other quality fibers to our value chain customers during these unprecedented times,” said Julien Born, president, apparel for The LYCRA Company. “Now more than ever, the medical community and other frontline workers are in critical need of well-fitting Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) that helps keep them safe. We are encouraged by the quick action of many of our customers who have shifted production to produce masks and other protective devices. And with the inclusion of LYCRA fiber, we hope to help our customers create a better wearer experience, so frontline workers can focus on what matters most – the health and wellness of our communities.”

TSG Finishing LLC

“We have just completed production trials on multiple non-medical woven upholstery fabrics which are now eligible for Level 1 and Level 2 (PPE) for gowns,” said Brian Rosenstein, CEO of TSG. “We are getting ready to run full production on these. The collaborative efforts of NCTO, IFAI, and INDA have been astounding. I am sure none of us feel we can move fast enough given this environment, but feel the entire textile industry has been very expeditious with response.”

Unifi Inc.

“We have more than 100 customers producing masks, gowns and other personal protective equipment needed by our first responders, medical personnel and military in the fight against COVID-19,” said Tom Caudle, president & chief operating officer of Unifi. “At Unifi, we’re proud to play a part in the fight by providing the fiber they need.”

Wearbest Weavers LLC

“In light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the shortage of necessary medical supplies, the mill has been successful in creating and pivoting their production to PPE textiles. I am very proud of our team effort to turn around our production so quickly,” said Greg Thomases, vice president of Wearbest parent company Swavelle. “We are fortunate to have a U.S. mill that provides us the capability to produce PPE product. We’ve accomplished a lot in just a few weeks and plan to continue innovating through this unprecedented time. Our hope is to help meet the needs of thousands of frontline healthcare workers.”

NCTO is a Washington-based trade association that represents domestic textile manufacturers, including artificial and synthetic filament and fiber producers.

  • U.S. employment in the textile supply chain was 585,240 in 2019.
  • The value of shipments for U.S. textiles and apparel was $75.8 billion in 2019.
  • U.S. exports of fiber, textiles and apparel were $29.1 billion in 2019.
  • Capital expenditures for textile and apparel production totaled $2.5 billion in 2018, the last year for which data is available.

Posted April 9, 2020

Source: The National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO)

CategoriesIn the News

TEXTILE INDUSTRY UNITES TO PLAY CRITICAL ROLE FOR THE NATION’S PRODUCTION OF PPE PRODUCTS

WASHINGTONThe National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO), representing the full spectrum of U.S. textiles from fiber through finished products, issued a statement today from textile executives leading the nation’s unified effort to produce critical personal protective equipment (PPE) to help hospitals and healthcare workers fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.

In factories across the country, textile companies are retooling production virtually overnight to produce PPE products ranging from hospital gowns, face masks and shoe covers to scrubs. The industry is playing a critical role in the nation’s manufacturing strategy and solution to help contribute to the high demand for these products.

“Coordinating with local hospitals, healthcare organizations, the entire U.S. production chain and federal agencies, the textile industry has been at the forefront of the incredible manufacturing effort, contributing to the country’s rapid response to the rising needs of frontline workers,” said NCTO President and CEO Kim Glas. “This industry has taken the lead in this effort, utilizing American manufacturing facilities and workers, despite facing many challenges in this environment.  Our industry will continue to do all they can to serve the American people, frontline hospital workers and patients at this time.”

U.S. apparel and textile executives, representing the entire supply chain, from fiber to finished apparel, share their involvement in the monumental task of providing PPE products during challenging times.  

The quotes—for use in any articles you are developing—from textile and apparel executives below offer a snapshot of efforts throughout the entire supply chain to provide PPE products for our nation.

As a demonstration of this effort, NCTO shares a few of the many stories emerging from our NCTO members at this time:

Beverly Knits Inc.

“Our team has stepped up to the challenge of fighting Covid-19 and flattening the curve,” said Ron Sytz, CEO of Beverly Knits. “We have organized a team of 25+ companies with over 4,000 American textile and apparel workers, to manufacture personal protective mask for HHS.  Through NCTO and SEAMS [The Association & Voice of the U.S. Sewn Products Industry] we continue to engage with additional companies to help fight this pandemic and flatten the curve.”

Burlington Industries LLC

“Burlington is proud to be a part of an industry with such compassion and call to action as we have seen over the last couple of weeks in the fight against COVID-19,” said Allen Smith, president Burlington, Safety Components & A&E – Americas. “With 40 years of experience in medical fabrics, Burlington is glad to offer its reusable woven products and technical expertise to those within and outside our industry who are stepping up to help produce lifesaving PPE.  Our employees are committed to the cause and working tirelessly in North Carolina to increase production, reallocate resources and support the evolving needs as much as possible.  Reusable fabrics are critical in reducing the scarcity of PPE and increasing availability on the front lines, offering responsible solutions with advanced protection, comfort and durability where it counts the most. Throughout our Elevate portfolio of brands we are also offering support through the use of A&E technical threads and utilizing our network of contacts and expertise across Cone Denim and Safety Components to make connections, offer guidance and facilitate meaningful conversations to support our communities and healthcare heroes.”

Cotswold Industries Inc.

“Cotswold and Central Textiles have pivoted to making PPE substrates for single use non-woven fabrics for and also for reusable PPE,” said James McKinnon CEO of Cotswold. “We have ramped our reusable fabric production and hope to produce 100-150K/week very shortly.”

Gildan Activewear Inc.

“We are pleased to join forces with various business partners in the U.S. to reopen some of Gildan’s global manufacturing facilities under a strict biosecurity protocol to produce face masks and isolation gowns in support of the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Chuck Ward, president of Gildan Yarns. “We are also proud to have donated a number of N95 protective face masks to local hospitals or health and human services organizations in the U.S. to support front line healthcare providers who continue to deliver exceptional care to patients and their families during this crisis,” he added.

Glen Raven Inc.

“The U.S. textile industry has emerged as a critical part of the solution in protecting our frontline workers from COVID-19,” said Leib Oehmig, Glen Raven CEO and NCTO chairman. “Through our collaborative efforts across the industry and with our employees, customers, suppliers and the medical community, the industry has retooled many operations and is supplying important PPE like masks, face shields, swabs, wipes, gowns and many other products. Glen Raven, through our business units, is actively working with our partners across many industries and have aligned our resources to focus on PPE inputs where we are in the best position to offer solutions. These include inputs for gowns, face shields, mask covers, and temporary structures. As part of our response, Glen Raven has organized a fabrication group with several of our customers who are producing face shields and gowns. This group is collaborating with hospital systems across the country to design and scale production of these important products.”

Greenwood Mills

“Venturing into a completely new territory in less than a week’s time was certainly a calculated risk, but one that we feel will pay off in the long run not just for our company, but for our larger community,” said Jay Self, president and chief operating officer of Greenwood Mills. “We have made the switch from denim production to masks and gowns. The first full week of production will result in about 30,000 masks. At full capacity, the company will produce 500,000 masks and 300,000 gowns per week, with flexibility depending on the demand of the products. It’s a testament to our workforce and ingenuity that we were able to make this transition happen so quickly.”

Hamrick Mills

“We at Hamrick Mills have dedicated a significant portion of our manufacturing capacity to the production of scrubs, gowns, masks, and related PPE,” said Jim Hopkins, director of sales at Hamrick. “We are considered and designated as an essential business concern and are intent on doing our share to assist those in need­ patients, front line first responders, and the general public, during this national crisis.”

Hanesbrands Inc.

“We are proud to be working with the apparel consortium and the National Council of Textile Organizations to rapidly mobilize to meet such an important and critical national need for face masks during this pandemic,” said Michael E. Faircloth, Hanesbrands group president, global operations, American casualwear and e-commerce. “Our employees and those of our consortium partners have been working around the clock to transition production from basic apparel to face mask production. This has required amazing cooperation and close coordination among the government, raw material suppliers, logistics providers and our supply chain employees. Together we are achieving a monumental task, which has resulted in the manufacture and delivery of millions of masks already with hundreds of millions more to come soon. Apparel industry leaders, particularly the consortium members, have successfully turned on a dime to meet the greater good of society.”

Lenzing Fibers Inc.

“Like many companies, Lenzing was working to understand exactly what was needed during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic and we already had fibers in a variety of PPE applications,” said David Adkins, Lenzing commercial manager-Americas Textiles. “Thanks to the information provided by NCTO and several other industry organizations we were able to better clarify market needs and determine and provide appropriate products to fit the markets requirement.”

Milliken & Company

“Many of Milliken’s U.S. customers in the flame resistant, workwear, and industrial space have pivoted their operations to manufacture PPE,” shared Chad McAllister, president of the Milliken Textile Division and EVP of Milliken & Company. “When we saw a need to shift to medical grade textiles, our team quickly stepped up. As of today, we have scaled production of these new products so that together with our customers we can help protect medical workers.”

MMI Textiles Inc.

 “For our part, MMI has been focusing on raw materials for all 4 gown levels, both immediate inventory and future production orders, N95 and personal protection masks, face shields and any other PPE raw material,” said Amy Bircher, president and founder of MMI.  “We successfully helped secure immediate raw material for Crye Precision, and they gave a shout out to us on a press conference with the Mayor of NYC.  We have secured finished masks to donate to local hospitals that we imported from overseas, and also bought face shields locally to donate.  MMI is stocking a variety of widths of elastic for use in a variety of PPE applications – our plan is to create a robust stock option so that customers can ultimately pull product for immediate delivery.”

Parkdale Inc.

“Parkdale has been an American company since 1916 and as such we feel a sense of duty and an obligation to answer our nation’s call for personal protective equipment,” said Anderson Warlick, Chairman and CEO of Parkdale. “We are proud to work with our industry colleagues as we work together to retool, re-equip and redirect our plants and supply chains so that every citizen in the United States gets a personal protection mask.”

Picanol of America

“The nature of Picanol of America, Inc., business is to support the U.S. textile industry, especially our weaving customers,” said Cyril Guérin, president of Picanol. “Spare parts, electronic repair and technical services are what we offer day in and day out. Throughout this ordeal, we have not skipped a beat, though the environment is clearly challenging. Our customers produce critical fabrics to be transformed in health care personnel uniform, mattress casing and sheets for the patients, and probably many other PPE. As long as our weaving customers will produce, we will stand by them.  This has created a tremendous amount of stress on our associates but their ‘forward looking’ attitude has been an inspiration. It is all about surviving this together.”

Schneider Mills

“Schneider Mills has been very active in the past few weeks in responding to many customer needs for fabric during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.  We have responded to hurried orders of fabric for the outdoor shelters you see outside medical facilities across America,” said Curt Parker, vice president of operations at Schneider Mills. “Demand in lightweight rip-stop fabrics being used for medical gowns and light weight tents has increased as well.  We are continuing to supply to the medical tape industry for 3M.  We are responding to a new customer for barrier fabrics in the medical end uses. We are pleased to be doing all we can to support our country in this war with COVID-19.  Our employees are putting forth great efforts in these changes as they occur rapidly.”

Shuford Yarns LLC

“Shuford makes yarn for several medical applications such as diabetic socks, gloves, cuffs for surgical gowns, towels going to the military through the Federal Prison industry. Shuford has been given a number of opportunities to participate in making yarns for PPE, surgical gowns etc…,” said Marvin Smith, president and CEO of Shuford. “We are working with a car manufacture who is making PPE for several hospitals in their local area. We also internally are using some of our people who are taking fabric from a few of customers and making PPE to give to people in our community.  With all the negatives in our country, our people have found ways to have a positive in our community.”

Standard Textile

“Our healthcare customers are on the front line of treating patients and saving lives, and we’re relentlessly working to ensure our customers and our communities have continuous access to essential supplies needed to safeguard the health of clinicians, patients, and their families,” said Gary Heiman, president and CEO of Standard Textile. Heiman is fiercely committed to manufacturing as much reusable PPE and other healthcare products as possible—as quickly as possible—to alleviate the stress placed upon the healthcare industry and support the fight against COVID-19.  “My concern is we are missing urgent collaboration opportunities with federal or state governments to allow us to serve healthcare workers who are at the frontline of this crisis,” said Heiman.

The Brickle Group

“The Brickle group will be starting production on a general everyday mask produced utilizing our filtration felt from our nonwoven division Bouckaert Industrial Textiles,” said Max Brickle, president of Brickle. “We have developed a supply chain of New England textile manufacturers to be able to produce these masks. The masks we are producing domestically are machine washable meant for everyday public use, not medical use. We are also involved in importing hospital grade PPE for the New England region.”

The LYCRA Company

“The LYCRA Company, the only spandex producer in the U.S., is proud to produce and supply LYCRA® fiber, nylon, and other quality fibers to our value chain customers during these unprecedented times,” said Julien Born, president, apparel for The LYCRA Company. “Now more than ever, the medical community and other frontline workers are in critical need of well-fitting Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) that helps keep them safe. We are encouraged by the quick action of many of our customers who have shifted production to produce masks and other protective devices. And with the inclusion of LYCRA® fiber, we hope to help our customers create a better wearer experience, so frontline workers can focus on what matters most – the health and wellness of our communities.”

TSG Finishing LLC

“We have just completed production trials on multiple non-medical woven upholstery fabrics which are now eligible for Level 1 and Level 2 (PPE) for gowns,” said Brian Rosenstein, CEO of TSG.  “We are getting ready to run full production on these.  The collaborative efforts of NCTO, IFAI, and INDA have been astounding. I am sure none of us feel we can move fast enough given this environment, but feel the entire textile industry has been very expeditious with response.”

Unifi Inc.

“We have more than 100 customers producing masks, gowns and other personal protective equipment needed by our first responders, medical personnel and military in the fight against COVID-19,” said Tom Caudle, president & chief operating officer of Unifi. “At Unifi, we’re proud to play a part in the fight by providing the fiber they need.” 

Wearbest Weavers LLC

“In light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the shortage of necessary medical supplies, the mill has been successful in creating and pivoting their production to PPE textiles. I am very proud of our team effort to turn around our production so quickly,” said Greg Thomases, vice president of Wearbest parent company Swavelle.  “We are fortunate to have a U.S. mill that provides us the capability to produce PPE product. We’ve accomplished a lot in just a few weeks and plan to continue innovating through this unprecedented time. Our hope is to help meet the needs of thousands of frontline healthcare workers.” 

###

NCTO is a Washington, DC-based trade association that represents domestic textile manufacturers, including artificial and synthetic filament and fiber producers. 

  • U.S. employment in the textile supply chain was 585,240 in 2019. 
  • The value of shipments for U.S. textiles and apparel was $75.8 billion in 2019. 
  • U.S. exports of fiber, textiles and apparel were $29.1 billion in 2019. 
  • Capital expenditures for textile and apparel production totaled $2.5 billion in 2018, the last year for which data is available.
CategoriesIn the News

Wearbest Weavers moves to address PPE shortfall

Garfield NJ – Wearbest Weavers, a longtime supplier of technical performance fabrics to the healthcare industry, is refocusing to meet the demand for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).

The fabrics Wearbest has developed comply with national standards to meet Barrier Levels I, II and III. The Barrier Level 1 fabric offers protection from pathogens and can be washed to commercial standards, which makes them qualified to be fabricated into medical gowns, hospital gowns, isolation gowns and other protective clothing.

In addition, Wearbest’s entire supply chain is compliant with the Berry Amendment, which requires the U.S. Department of Defense to give preference in procurement to U.S. goods. From raw materials to finished product, everything required is domestically produced.

“I am very proud of our team effort to turn around our production so quickly,” said Greg Thomases, VP of Wearbest parent company Swavelle. “We are fortunate to have a U.S. mill that provides us the capability to produce PPE product.”

Wearbest is capable of producing a minimum of 20,000 yards of medical grade fabric per week.

CategoriesIn the News

The design industry gives back: How dozens of brands are contributing to coronavirus relief efforts

CORONAVIRUS | APR 6, 2020 | The design industry gives back: How dozens of brands are contributing to coronavirus relief effortsBy Marina Felix

The strain that the coronavirus is inflicting upon the global health sector is devastating—critical shortages of supplies, high-risk circumstances for medical staff and dwindling funds for many facilities. In a profound and heartwarming display of community, people and companies outside the medical sector are pitching in to support the all-consuming COVID-19 relief efforts. To tally every contribution is an impossible task—but BOH has compiled dozens of design industry names and their initiatives below, to celebrate how each is doing its part to contribute during this crisis.

Updated April 13 to include Be Original Americas and Classy Art.

SALES THAT GIVE BACKThese brands are donating a portion of their proceeds to organizations that are on the front lines of the coronavirus fight. Start shopping!

Aerin In an effort to support the communities of the tri-state area, the luxury lifestyle brand Aerin is donating 20 percent of sales from its home decor and tabletop and bar categories to God’s Love We Deliver—a nonprofit organization that prepares and delivers meals to people unable to provide or prepare food for themselves—through April 15.

Artsy This month, the online art platform has announced that it will donate 10 percent of sales from its “Give Back” collections to the COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund for the World Health Organization. The other proceeds will go to the represented galleries and their artists. This comes as part of Artsy’s recently launched #ArtKeepsGoing campaign, created to unite the art world and art industry at large. “This moment in time is unprecedented for the world and our respective communities,” says Marina Cashdan, vice president of editorial, brand and creative at Artsy. “With the physical art world indefinitely closed, we wanted to demonstrate how art keeps going during times of crisis and uncertainty.”

East Fork’s Gift a Mug The Asheville, North Carolina–based ceramics company East Fork has launched an initiative called Gift a Mug to support Vecinos, a free clinic that serves uninsured and underinsured patients working on farms. For every mug purchased, the $25 will go directly to Vecinos, and the mug will be gifted to a health care worker at Mission Hospital.

The design industry gives back: How dozens of brands are contributing to coronavirus relief efforts

The Damask pillow in Blush from Pillow PopsCourtesy of Pillow Pops

Everhem The Los Angeles–based company that offers made-to-order window treatments is currently offering 30 percent off all orders, and will donate a portion of sales to the Los Angeles Regional Foodbank and the L.A. Emergency COVID-19 Crisis Fund. Everhem also plans to donate to the two COVID-19 relief funds set up by Gates Philanthropy Partners.

General Assembly The Brooklyn–based interior architecture studio General Assembly has launched “At Home,” an online auction “from home and for the home” until April 12. Proceeds will support Direct Relief’s COVID-19 fund. Participating brands include Apparatus, Calico Wallpaper, Egg Collective and Roll & Hill.

Save the date! Business of Home will host Client Management with Sean Low on April 15 at 1:00 p.m. Like all LAUNCH programming, the class is free for BOH Insiders. Click here to register.

Guy Regal Five percent of any sale made on the fine art and furniture dealer’s website (or through its storefront on InCollect) will go to Citymeals on Wheels to serve at-risk community members.

Pillow Pops For all of April and May, the cushions brand Pillow Pops is committing 10 percent of sales to No Kid Hungry to help provide meals to vulnerable children away from school.

Plover The Seattle–based textile company Plover is making GOTS-certified organic cotton masks from its fabric scraps. The masks are being sold in packs of two online and via Instagram DM—for every unit sold, Plover will donate a two-pack to medical professionals in need.

Southern Guild“Closer, Still” The Southern Guild has launched “Closer, Still,” a group art exhibition to benefit those most vulnerable in South Africa during the COVID-19 crisis. Until May 9, 30 percent of sales from works sold will be donated to Afrika Tikkun, a non-profit that provides education, health and social services in South African townships for over 25 years.

‘Stay Home, Send Beds’ Initiative from Serta Simmons Bedding Serta Simmons Bedding, the parent company of Serta, Beautyrest and Tuft & Needle, committed to donating 10,000 mattresses to New York City hospitals and medical facilities that are facing shortages of hospital beds. They’​​ve also launched the ‘​​​​​​Stay Home, Send Beds’​​ initiative to facilitate bed donations for hospitals. Anyone who wishes can purchase a bed to be distributed in whichever U.S. city they choose. For every 25 beds that are donated, Serta will donate another on top of the 10,000 it has already committed.

VIRTUAL CAMPAIGNSCompanies are finding innovative ways to stay connected online—and make a difference in the process.

Benjamin Moore In collaboration with the Painting Contractors Association, Benjamin Moore has pledged to underwrite participation costs for the PCA’s Operation COVID-19 Response, an eight-week online conference aiming to provide strategies and resources to painting contractors. With the help of Benjamin Moore, both PCA members and non-members will be able to take advantage of this virtual training.

#DesignStandsTogether The design and architecture PR firm Novità launched the campaigns #DesignStandsTogether and #OneWithItaly on March 12 as a way of uniting the industry through bright news amidst the COVID-19 headlines.

#DoingWellbyDoingRight The non-profit organization Be Original Americas is launching its #DoingWellByDoingRight campaign on Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook to advocate for design authenticity, spotlighting members that are making an impact with design.

Formica Through its Lunch & Learn program, Formica educates architects and designers about new surfacing products—and since the onset of the coronavirus, the company has moved these trainings online. Now, for every video view through April 30, Formica will donate 10 meals to Feeding America food banks nationwide.

Forty One Madison’s #TableTogether From Forty One Madison comes #TableTogether, a social initiative launched as a response to New York’s canceled Tabletop Market. For every photo posted on Instagram with the tag, Forty One Madison will purchase a gift card to a restaurant in Flatiron district. Each person who posts, registers and attends the next New York Tabletop Market will be able to claim a gift card.

Garnet Hill The retail brand has not only donated 50 sets of organic cotton sheets for face mask production, but the company has also promised to match up to $1 million in customer and team member donations to Meals on Wheels and No Kid Hungry.

Southern Studio Simplified Southern Studio, the Cary, North Carolina–based firm, has launched a new design program called Southern Studio Simplified. This exclusive opportunity will help clients tackle smaller projects through virtual consultations—each week, the design team will focus on a different topic, ranging from gallery walls and home offices to color choices and kids’ rooms. For every consultation scheduled during the course of the coronavirus pandemic, the Southern Studio team pledges one hour of volunteer service to the local Cary community.

Stitchroom The Brooklyn-based custom upholstery platform is not only making masks, but has also launched a site that connects able sewers with hospitals in need, as well as an accompanying Facebook page to field questions and foster community.

Westchester Mask Making Campaign In collaboration with Plaza Park Interiors in Mamaroneck and Amy Interiors in Eastchester, Patricia O’Shaughnessy Design in Bronxville is coordinating a grassroots effort to facilitate the sewing, making and distribution of masks and personal protective equipment for New York hospitals and health care facilities. In addition to calling for cotton fabric donations and volunteer services, the campaign has started a GoFundMe page where monetary donations can be made to support sewers in the workrooms.

THE INDUSTRY MASK-FORCEIndustry manufacturers are pivoting their production facilities to make medical supplies. They deserve a standing ovation—not only for their donations, but also for the employees who have committed to helping their communities.

American Leather In the words of the Dallas-based manufacturer, “We may not be making furniture at the moment due to the COVID-19 crisis; however, we’re busy making masks and gowns each week for people on the front lines.”

Ann Gish & The Art of Home Retailer Ann Gish has put its home lifestyle department to work sewing face masks out of leftover fabric, donating them to the pediatric ICU at New York–Presbyterian Hospital.

Appleton Partners LLP The Santa Monica, California–based architecture firm has risen to the occasion and begun 3-D printing reusable plastic face masks for local hospitals and medical facilities.

Aria Designs The North Carolina–based upholstery and leather company Aria Designs has secured funding from CIT Group to tap into its global supply chain and manufacturers to bring N95 surgical masks to health care facilities across the state.

Austin’s Couch Potatoes On March 20, the Texas-based furniture store and manufacturer began sewing face masks and hospital gowns to help fill the shortages presented by the spread of COVID-19. The company is partnering with Austin Disaster Relief Network to get the supplies to those local facilities, and aims to make 3,500 (free) masks a day, adding hospital gowns to their production list.

Avery Boardman Custom upholstery brand Avery Boardman has been gathering materials and reaching out to manufacturers to donate supplies to mask and medical equipment to hospitals.

Baker The contemporary furniture brand Baker has dedicated its U.S. manufacturing facilities, design resources and high-quality fabrics to the production of masks and gowns, all of which will be donated to local hospitals in North Carolina.

Century Furniture Working with companies like Sherrill Furniture Brands, Century Furniture is donating materials to the Owosso, Michigan–based furniture company Woodard to assist in the production of masks.

Classy Art For a limited time, while supplies last, the Houston, Texas–based wall décor company is giving free disposable masks to retailers, accepting requests via email.

The Company Store The Company Store has donated 600 units of cotton sheet to TX N95, Quilting for a Cause, Sewing Masks for Atlanta Hospitals and Project Runway alumna Amanda Perna, all of whom are using the fabric to sew face masks.

The design industry gives back: How dozens of brands are contributing to coronavirus relief efforts

An employee sewing a mask out of CW Stockwell’s Martinique fabric in OliveCourtesy of CW Stockwell

CW Stockwell x Caitlin Wilson Design x Delgado NYC Together, CW Stockwell, Caitlin Wilson’s eponymous Dallas firm, and handbag designer Delgado NYC have teamed up to produce over 1,000 nonmedical masks to donate to health care workers nationwide. The trio started a GoFundMe page to help compensate the men and women who are sewing the masks.

Eastern Accents The luxury bedding and linens brand Eastern Accents has shifted operations, devoting its resources to producing up to 1,000 face masks each day, to be donated to hospitals and other facilities in the Chicago area. The company has also made the masks available for purchase online, with all proceeds going to the donation drive.

EJ Victor In recent weeks, the High Point, North Carolina–based furniture manufacturer has taken a serious look at its supply chain, strategizing ways that the company can give back to local health care facilities. Already underway is mask production, with medical-grade surgical gowns and reclining hospital beds in the works, CFO David Bennett tells Business of Home.

Eskayel As states begin to encourage citizens to wear masks in public, the textile company Eskayel is now selling them to consumers in sets of five, pledging all sales to COVID-19 relief.

Fabricut The Tulsa, Oklahoma–based fabric company has converted its sample room to mask making, donating Fabricut masks to local health care workers at three major hospital systems.

Food52 x Steele Canvas While Amanda Hesser has been keeping our kitchens busy through Instagram Live cooking demonstrations, another part of the Food52 team has partnered with one of their makers, Steele Canvas, to create denim and flannel masks. The home goods company is selling them online in a buy-one-give-one model for medical facilities around the U.S. In the first 36 hours of the preorder, the brand was able to donate 10,000 masks—and a second preorder is already underway.

Goddard Design Group Goddard Design Group noticed early on that the memo samples in its library were the perfect size to make washable mask covers. Calling on the help of local seamstresses and workrooms, the firm has teamed up with the Arkansas Arts & Fashion Forum to donate home-sewn masks to local medical facilities, as well as accept donations of usable cotton fabric.

Harvard GSD The Harvard Graduate School of Design has begun the production of PPE using its over 100 3D printers. The school has produced nearly 1,000 face shields and 750 visors, all of which are being donated to Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

Holly Hunt Holly Hunt is partnering with a local Chicago drapery workroom to convert Great Plains textiles into nonsurgical mask covers, all of which will be donated to local hospitals.

Jiun Ho at Dennis Miller Associates Using textiles from its own inventory, Jiun Ho is working to produce medical masks for health care workers.

Kravet Inc. Out of its South Carolina warehouse, Kravet is not only producing face masks, but has donated over 1,000 yards of fabric to Woodard to help sew masks in bulk.

The design industry gives back: How dozens of brands are contributing to coronavirus relief efforts

A model of the hospital bed design by Loll DesignsCourtesy of Loll Designs

Loll Designs Usually, this Minnesota–based company manufactures outdoor furnishings from recycled plastic materials. Since the pandemic, however, Loll Designs has shifted operations, and is now making ready-to-build hospital field beds with reclining backs and adjustable headrests. Fashioned from durable and sanitary HDPE (high-density polyethylene), these beds are recyclable and available for worldwide shipping.

Matouk Currently Matouk is able to produce over 3,000 fabric masks per day, and will continue to do so long as the health care industry needs. The company is also producing an additional 25,000 masks per week with their partners in the Philippines.

Mohawk Industries Flooring manufacturing company Mohawk Industries has teamed up with Fabric Sources International to begin producing medical isolation gowns and protective face shields in Atlanta and around Dalton, Georgia. Mohawk has shifted the focus of its engineering and sewing teams to design, test and create medical gowns, averaging 1,200 per day (and growing). While initial donations are going to local medical centers, the companies hope to expand their reach to other Georgia hospitals.

The New Traditionalists and Ducduc Custom furniture designer The New Traditionalists have come together with sister brand Ducduc Kids, transitioning the company’s production facility to make essential health care furniture like beds, carts, partitions, dividers and day care furniture in addition to face masks and gowns.

Norwalk Furniture The Ohio furniture company has been approved by Huron County to run as an essential business to redirect production to make hospital gowns and masks.

Ortho Mattress Ortho Mattress has reconfigured operations in its Phoenix factory and is now producing 1,000 nonmedical face masks each day to donate to essential workers, asking only for the cost of shipping to be covered.

Peacock Alley Based in Dallas, the luxury bed and bath linens company Peacock Alley has been producing masks made by its skeleton crew of on-site seamstresses, with others working from home. Currently, the masks are going to hospitals and other front-line workers.

Pindler Fabric design and developer Pindler invites designers to join them in sewing for the #MillionMaskChallenge, a Twitter-born tag to rally both industry sewers and DIY-ers to sew masks to meet the critical needs of health care workers, and now, civilians.

PPEople Brigade Started by Paige Cox, a Greensboro, North Carolina–based textile artist and the co-founder of Reconsidered Goods, a nonprofit for re-purposing creative materials, the PPEople Brigade is a grassroots network working to make and donate face masks and sheilds. Over 1,000 have been donated to local North Carolina hospitals, and several have been shipped to Michigan and New York state as well.

Ralph Lauren Corporation The fashion and lifestyle brand has pledged $10 million to COVID-19 relief, which will provide financial grants through the Emergency Assistance Foundation; contribute to the World Health Organization COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund; support the Pink Pony Fund for vulnerable cancer patients; and give an inaugural gift to the Council of Fashion Designers of America/Vogue Fashion Fund for COVID-19 relief. What’s more, the company is producing 250,000 masks and 25,000 isolation gowns for donation with its U.S. manufacturing partners.

RCH Studios The design collective RCH Studios is mobilizing its resources to begin 3-D printing face shields for hospital workers—its team is currently producing between 80 and 100 units weekly.

Roger and Chris The North Carolina–based custom furniture company has dedicated a portion of its team to sew face masks to donate to those on the front lines of COVID-19 relief.

Rosemary Hallgarten The Fairfield, Connecticut–based rug and fabric brand has donated their Linen Emil fabric to an unnamed designer in Chicago who is making masks for emergency workers. The company has also tasked its own workroom with making masks for local Connecticut hospitals.

Salone del Mobile.Milano The fair was postponed, but the organizers of Salone del Mobile didn’t let that stop them from supporting their community. With thanks expressed to the Chinese design sector, VNU Exhibitions Asia, FederlegnoArredo and Salone del Mobile.Milano, 545,000 medical masks have been donated to the Italian Red Cross.

Sandra Jordan Prima Alpaca The Healdsburg, California–based company is partnering with its artisan network to “lend a helping hoof” by donating archived fabric to its partners to sew hundreds of non-surgical masks for local health care workers in Sonoma County.

Schumacher Not only has Schumacher donated hundreds of yards of fabric to the efforts organized by Woodard and other smaller mask-making initiatives, the luxury fabric brand is currently producing about 500 masks per day at its facility in South Carolina. Approximately 1,500 masks will ship next week to the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, in addition to the masks being donated to local South Carolina health care workers.

Sherrill Furniture Brands The North Carolina–based furniture company has been working with Woodard, donating materials to help produce masks for hospitals and emergency workers.

Silk Road Rug Inc. The Los Angeles–based rug distributor and workroom is seeking donations of unused fabric rolls and sample remnants from the interior design and textile industries in L.A. County to go towards handmade face masks to be donated to local hospitals and doctor offices. Silk Road Rug Inc. has converted three-quarters of its workroom to make protective gear for health care workers.

Stylex The New Jersey–based office seating brand is producing washable, protective masks for health care workers. Stylex invites those in the tri-state area to connect with its team should they want to join the initiative, or if they know of facilities in need of supplies.

Sutherland Furniture Sutherland Furniture and Perennials Fabrics have pivoted operations and dedicated their warehouses to the production of health masks to be donated to health care workers and others fighting on the COVID-19 front lines, using the hashtag #TheHeartOfDesign on Instagram as part of their initiative. The solution-dyed acrylic fabric masks are bleach-washable and will extend the life of regulation N95 face masks and can withstand repeated cleaning.

Swavelle Wearbest Weavers, a subsidiary of Swavelle, has successfully pivoted to creating PPE textiles that comply with national standards to meet Barrier I, II and III qualifications. The goods are qualified to be sewn into medical, hospital and isolation gowns, as well as other protective clothing.

A woman sewing a mask in the Thibaut workroomCourtesy of Thibaut

Thibaut The Newark, New Jersey–based sewing department at Thibaut, the fine fabrics and wallcoverings company, has been busy making fabric face masks to aid health care and essential workers extend the life of their equipment. Thibaut not only has donated over 600 masks, but it has also donated fabric to sewers and workrooms nationwide.

The Urban Electric Co. When construction and engineering company the Bourne Group asked if Urban Electric would be willing to help produce face shields, the custom lighting company answered with gusto. Using its water jet capabilities, donated equipment and their craftsman crew, Urban Electric is working to make thousands of these face shields to donate to the Medical University of South Carolina and the staff at Ropers St. Francis Healthcare.

CategoriesPerformance Fabric

Global Furniture Performance Fabric Market Key Companies Analysis with Market Opportunities : ( Revolution Fabrics )

 

 

The study report on the Global Furniture Performance Fabric Market 2020 gives a detailed and good-sized analysis that consists of a complete view of the world industry contain the recent trend in addition to the fore-casted amplitude of the world business with admire to service & products. In addition, the Furniture Performance Fabric market research offers an outline of the world scenario with the complete segmentation with the aid of end-user, type, application, in addition to a region through the whole traction evaluation of the overall Furniture Performance Fabric market. Moreover, this report offers a qualified study about the market to evaluate the predominant vendors by way of combining all the associated services and products to understand the positions of the leading market players within the Furniture Performance Fabric industry.

>> [ Conjointly enclosed free report contains a quick introduction to the abstract, table of contents, list of tables and figures, competitive landscape and geographic segmentation, innovation and future developments supported the methodology of investigation.] <<

Top Manufacturers Analysis in Furniture Performance Fabric market 2020:

Revolution Fabrics
Valdese Weavers
Sunbrella (Glen Raven)
Chella
Crypton
American Silk Mills
Bella-Dura (Wearbest Sil-Tex Mills)
Perennials and Sutherland
Richloom Fabrics
Toray

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Furniture Performance Fabric Market Analysis: by product type-

Solution Dyed Acrylic
Microfiber Nonwoven

Furniture Performance Fabric Market Analysis: by Application-

Commercial Furniture
Residential Furniture

The Regional Focused Zone Includes:-

  •  The Middle East and Africa Furniture Performance Fabric market.
  •  Asia-Pacific Furniture Performance Fabric Market (China, Japan, India).
  •  Europe Furniture Performance Fabric Market (Germany), France, United Kingdom).
  •  Latin America Furniture Performance Fabric Market (Brazil)
  •  North America Furniture Performance Fabric market (USA).

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1. What are the Key Manufacturers, raw material suppliers, equipment suppliers, end users, traders and distributors in Furniture Performance Fabric Market?

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CategoriesBella-Dura

Showtime’s date change doesn’t dampen fabric offerings

This press release is submitted and shown here in its original form, unedited by furtituretoday.com.

 

In Covington Fabric and Design’s showroom, designer Hilary Farr shows one of her new fabrics, Hello Polly.

HIGH POINT — The International Textile Alliance Showtime fabric market kicked off with its new, earlier date last week, moving the show up several weeks from its former December timing.

Although this date change, first announced by the ITA in March, created sampling issues for some resources, the market did not suffer for a lack of new product as manufacturers brought out hundreds on new SKUs and made waves with major business announcements, tech innovations and more.

Among them was Covington Fabric and Design’s full launch of its collection with design personality Hilary Farr. Best known for her role on HGTV’s “Love It or List It,” Farr’s Love It collection was initially previewed at Braxton Culler during October High Point Market on the designer’s furniture collection.

The collection is made up of 63 unique SKUs in shades that spans from neutral grays and browns to a refreshing fuchsia and blush assortment that made a big impression. Standout patterns included Lounge Lizard, a texturized lizard skin look available in several shades, and Come Together, a detailed embroidery that depicts scenes of people paired with animals and a patterned floral that plays on Farr’s theme of celebrating merging arts and cultures.

“I wanted to give people some color options to play with,” said Farr. “You have your neutrals here, but then you can throw in one of the brighter colors and just have a lot of fun with it.”

Also playing up color this round, Culp grouped its new and existing patterns into color inspirations, highlighting everything from a deep green color story to a more natural brown theme. The biggest hit, according to Culp design and sales consultant Kay Lawrence, was a grouping of blush pink the company calls Rose.

“The color isn’t really new, and it’s been kind of popular for a while, but it’s really gotten a lot of attention this market,” said Lawrence.

Throughout this market, pastel shades such as Culp’s blush pink were popular.

At Premier Prints, a minty blue and blush pink pairing found its way onto several new print varieties, doing especially well on new and existing animal skins. Skins, according to the digitally printed fabric resource, have remained among its bestselling offerings for several seasons, prompting more introductions this round.

Mergers and acquisitions

At Richloom Fabrics Group’s brand, a similar pastel blue found its way onto new color groups from the company’s outdoor Solarium brand, too.

Color stories were hardly the big news at Richloom though as the company spent much of this event celebrating the official acquisition of N.C.-based Chambers Fabrics.

Richloom, which began its relationship with Chambers Fabrics about six months ago as a strategic partner, announced the completion of the acquisition on the first day of Showtime. For Richloom, the move represents an opportunity to begin producing more domestically, and COO Michael Saivetz has confirmed that customers can expect to see fabrics produced as a part of the acquisition from all of Richloom’s brands at upcoming Showtime events.

“Domestic product will complement our existing network of globally sourced fabrics, offering our customers a diverse choice of fabric applications,” said Saivetz about the new domestic production opportunities.

American Silk Mills celebrated acquisitions this market, too, as the fabric resource showed off the first results of its partnership with parent company Sutlej Textiles. Called ASM Loft, the collection boasts a sophisticated look and feel with complex yarns and constructions at a lower price point (body cloths run between $9 and $14 per yard, while jacquards top out at approximately $15 per yard) thanks to the production capabilities of Sutlej’s India-based facilities.

Working off the idea of creating casual luxury, according to American Silk Mill Creative Director Susan Hedgecock, the collection’s color palette includes a spectrum of organic hues such as blush, thistle, linen, graphite, sage and indigo. Those colors can be found across a range of textured plains and classic patterned pieces.

In addition, American Silk Mills introduced its highly detailed Anthology collection of refined velvets, epingles and silks spread across three color palettes. Inspired by the company’s extensive archives, the fabrics feature Chinese Chippendale and Japanese stylized florals, classic damask patterns and more.

Also celebrating partnerships this market was commercial performance fabric brand Bella-Dura which launched its residential performance line: Bella-Dura Home. Debuting with more than 50 patterns in multiple color ways, the brand offers its commercial strength in residential-focused designs such as multi-toned plains and more decorative looks with reimagined leaf, line and stripe work.

In colors, a full range of neutrals is offered with special attention paid to blues, especially a smoky teal highlighted by Sarah Keelen, director of design for outdoor and performance for Bella-Dura’s parent company Swavelle.

“Blue is kind of our signature color at this point,” said Keelan. “These shades bring something new to the table.”

Feature focus

Valdese Weavers had a lot to celebrate and show at this market as well, as the company launched an expansive color customization program for its Crypton Home Fabrics pieces and announced that the Crypton Companies would be continuing its exclusive partnership with the company, allowing Valdese Weavers to manufacture Crypton Home Fabric through 2024.

In addition, the company showcased a hand-woven look, called Fiber Workshop, across its Circa 1801, Dicey Fabrics, Home Fabrics by Wesley Mancini and Valdese Weavers brand design teams. The collection made use of natural materials and several other unique materials and designs to create an artisan look.

A brand-new yarn for the company called “the artisan twist,” which is being made at the company’s N.C.-based facility, is featured prominently throughout.

At Valdese Weaver’s performance brand Insideout, a performance leather look caught a lot of attention. It offers a realistic hand in a variety of colors like navy, natural brown and more that pair well with the brand’s other performance textiles.

In real leather, JBS Couros focused on a cleaner story with its new Kind Leather. Made using 46% less water and 42% less chemicals than the traditional tanning process, Kind Leather offered people a unique new option this market.

At Moore & Giles, the semi aniline Regency made a splash as a scratch-free option in a span of furniture-friendly browns, blacks, grays and cream shades, and at Crest Leather, the company’s new showroom was big news this market. Making the move from the temporaries to a permanent showroom on the third floor of the Home Fashions Resource Center, Crest Leather showed off a lightly buffed, slightly distressed aniline leather called Old English.

Elsewhere in the resource center, STI’s Brentwood Textiles brand featured unique, phrase fabrics with crossstitch-like wording created for pillow placement. Designer Kathy Dotterer said she started creating the pieces custom for clients and is now looking to move them into larger production.

At Sunbrella, pillows were a focus, too, as the performance fabric brand rolled out a range of engineered pillow prints.

Complete with cut-and-sew lines, the designs coordinated with Sunbrella’s other indoor-focused introductions this market and included textural line work, a continued play on the handmade look and contrasting black-and-white color palettes that paired with gray and brown mixes.

The new product offering got a good initial reaction from customers, according to Greg Voorhis, executive design director at Sunbrella.

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